Raccoon mojo

Penis bones.  Baculum.  Texas Toothpicks.  Mojo Moneymakers.  Amazing little things, except when you factor in the size of a raccoon they may not seem so little, measuring in at about 5″.  Plenty of animals have bones in their penises, although this was news to me two years ago when I stumbled upon the lore of the Racoon Baculum in Melissa Milgrom’s book Still Life in which she mentions passing one onto a friend who was trying to conceive (It worked).  Apparently this bone, when worn as an amulet, is believed to bring baby mojo.  It also just helps folks get laid in general apparently.  I think this may be true of all penis bones but the raccoons have a good deal of lore about them which is actually quite fun to, er, bone up on.  AHHHHHH I couldn’t resist sorry. Seriously though, dig this video I found called “Magical Testicle Montage

For more background on the myth of a raccoon’s unparalleled reproductive organs, check out this blog post on The Palmetto Bug blog:

RACCOONTANG AND THE TEXAS TOOTHPICK

 

Aside from hyper-sensitive paw pads and the penchant for oral sex, raccoons are notable for their beautiful penis bones.  They’re elegantly shaped with a slight barb at the end, which I have covered in filigree and topped with a genuine swarovski-set Amethyst.

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This particular piece is already sold but I have more bones coming.  If you’re familiar with me or my writing, you know I dig on the magic vibes so this new line of baculum art is way fun for me.  I’ll let you know if the recipient to this item gets preggo too, in case that’s something you’re interested in.  According to that Palmetto article, they’re good for gambling luck when wrapped in a ten-dollar bill. I’ll try that with a fox boner and report back to you.

filigre detail

Keep your skull and jaws close to your skull and jaws.

This is a short and sweet little post featuring four new pairs of joined earrings (also known as “continuous earrings”, “earclaces” and “necklings”- I’ve been making these for 10+ years and have yet to find a way to properly market them for lack of a better name) which are being sold exclusively at Wilbur Vintage on Fabric Row in Philadelphia.  Available in person or on the shop’s Etsy page.

These earrings are surprisingly easy and fun to wear; they’re lighter than they look and give the wearer something to fiddle with, talk about or just enjoy the movement of.

I struggle to find a tag or reference name to go with pieces like this, as bone art is not actually taxidermy.  The term “osteopathicraft” was recently suggested to me but it’s a bit of a mouthful so I’m going to go with “Osteocraft” for now.  If you can com up with something better, please tell me your ideas in the comments!

First up: Rat Skull filigree earrings joined by black silk fringe:

The skull and fringe are both pleasantly lightweight and easy on the lobes.


Next: Pearlized Grey Fox jawbones earrings joined by a double strand of pearl beaded chain.  These are just a tad heavier than the rat skull earrings but completely wearable nonetheless.

I painted a pearlescent paint on the jaw and left a stripe untouched, just for fun:

Thirdly, we have a pair of pearlized grey fox jaw bone earrings with filigree detail  joined by white silk fringe:

Last but not least, Pearlized Grey Fox jaw bone earrings joined by a single strand of pearl beaded chain, with added chain and pearl detail:

Ding-a-ling-a-ling!

I am constantly producing these so if you want something you’re not seeing please contact me for a custom order.  Otherwise, get yourself to Wilbur Vintage ASAP and scoop up a pair!